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 On Brighde Chaimbeul’s overwhelming debut

Ah, how blissful is the feeling when you realize that after two minutes of playing a new record you know you’ve got pure gold in your hands: the discovery of a new place with magnificent roads to get lost in, only to examine every bystreet and alley of it and to keep the place close to your heart. Nothing less than a coup de foudre - this was exactly the case when I first listened to 20-year-old Brighde Chaimbeul’s The Reeling: a mystical record, filled with smallpipe drones, ancient Gaelic dances and subtle touches of concertina and canntaireachd singing, produced by Aidan O’Rourke. If you like dwelling around in the alley where Kali Malone and Laura Cannell reside, look no further. The Reeling might be one of your albums of the year. I called her to discuss the album’s origins, compositions and recording process.
12 November 2019 | AG 14
Dries Robbe 

Nice to meet you Brighde (pronounced Bree-Chu in Gaelic). Congratulations on your amazing debut album! Can you tell me something more about your musical background and the instrument you’re playing on it?

B
DR

Regarding the origins of the tunes, from what region do they come from?

BC

Most of the tunes come from Gaelic songs, hailing from the Scottish Highlands and the West Coast. Gaelic is my first language, so I wanted to make

DR

Do you combine Scottish and Bulgarian tunes? 

BC

I haven’t done this on the album or in other recordings, but you can play around with it, starting with a slow Bulgarian tune and make it flow into a Scottish tune. Ma

DR

What can we expect from your concert in Ghent?

BC

I’ll be playing a solo smallpipes set with music from my latest record and some other traditional songs. They could originate from Scotland, Ireland, Bulg